• FAIR – supporting auto accident victims through advocacy and education
  • FAIR – supporting auto accident victims through advocacy and education
  • FAIR – supporting auto accident victims through advocacy and education
  • FAIR – supporting auto accident victims through advocacy and education

Latest News Articles

July 4, 2019

Do pool noodles count in impaired driving laws? Here’s what a canoeing conviction means in practice

Canadian legal history was made last week after an Ontario man, David Sillars, was convicted of impaired operation of a canoe.

The case, which involved the death of an eight-year-old boy after the canoe tipped, required the Ontario Court of Justice to determine whether a canoe counts under Canada’s impaired driving laws. Justice Peter West had to issue a special ruling on this aspect of the case, and he concluded: yes, canoes count.

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Civil jury trial system needs update: Lee

Ontario’s civil jury system “reduces access to justice for many injured plaintiffs” and needs to be modernized, says Toronto personal injury lawyer Andrew M. Lee
 
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The Use of Social Media in Personal Injury Litigation – What Our Clients Need to Know

It likely started with Friendster – we then moved on to Myspace. Now we have Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, Pinterest, Tumblr, LinkedIn and YouTube. There are many others, and there is no doubt there will continue to be more in the future. 
 
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MANDEL: Three strikes and Mississauga psychiatrist is out

Dr. Christopher Doyle was stripped of his licence last year by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (CPSO) for incompetence and professional misconduct, including sending a troubled woman to hospital in a suicidal state after abruptly firing her as a patient. 
 
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Concussion rates higher than previously reported, Ont. study suggests

Increasing awareness and understanding of concussions are allowing researchers to better track the prevalence of the condition, a new study suggests, noting that rates of such injuries in Ontario are about twice as previously reported. 
 

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